Science and Technology Difference

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Science and technology share a lot in common. However they do differ. The following definitions may help you decide whether your project is better suited to a science or technology category. For more details, see your teacher or the Science and Technology Fair Coordinator at your school.

Good Science – usually involves the development of an hypothesis, the testing of that hypothesis by controlled experimentation or observation, the collection and analysis of data to produce results and the drawing of valid conclusions based on those results.

Good Technology – usually involves the design and development of a solution to a problem and yields a product, process or environment that serves a real need.

Below is a table that will help you ascertain whether your project is a science project or a technology project. Some projects will fall in between the two categories and the judges will decide which they belong to.

Science Technology
Rather than meeting a human need or opportunity, is the exhibit primarily driven by curiosity about something?

Yes

No

Is the exhibit a response to a hypothesis?

Yes

No

Is the exhibit a response to an identified human need or opportunity for a product, process or environment?

No

Yes

Was some of the research aimed at confirming the validity of the original need or opportunity, and/or finding out the precise nature of the problem to which you are developing a solution?

No

Yes

Was most of the research aimed at gathering new data in response to an observation and/or hypothesis?

Yes

No

Did the gathering and processing of data ensure its validity and aim to determine its significance to causes of an effect?

Yes

No

Was much of the research aimed at guiding the development and/or improving the performance of the product, process or environment?

No

Yes

Is the scientific method the core process?

Yes

No

Is a design process the core process?

No

Yes

Does the exhibit identify as important such attributes as: efficiency, optimisation, reliability, cost-effectiveness, appropriateness of materials, ergonomics, aesthetics, etc?

No

Yes

Does the exhibit show that the satisfaction of the end users of a product, process or environment was a key factor in guiding development?

No

Yes

Is it concerned with something that could be mass-produced?

No

Yes

Has an attempt been made to falsify an hypothesis?

Yes

No

Has a theory been formulated to explain the observations?

Yes

No

Is the development of the identified product, process or environment the key element of the exhibit, including documentation with sufficient plans, models etc., to verify the development process?

No

Yes